Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Grasshopper Pie - A Frozen Cookstove Dessert

I am just old enough to remember the time when microwave ovens came into popular use.  My parents bought theirs shortly after I was born, but I distinctly remember when both sets of my grandparents bought theirs, and I was near to junior high age when my aunt Meme began to use one.  No one in our family did much cooking in their microwaves; their primary service was to re-heat leftovers, and I think (with a few exceptions) that is how most of us still use them.

Eventually, I'd like to do a series of posts about how to use a woodburning cookstove to re-warm leftovers because one of the purposes of this blog is to show people what a flexible appliance wood cookstoves are.  Another purpose of the blog is to show that older methods of cooking can still be viable in today's world.

Now, I'm not sure that the recipe that I'm about to share even really qualifies as cooking because it is so easy--"food preparation" yes, but "cooking" not so much.  This is because the heat is only applied to some ingredients to melt them, not to change their chemical composition.  (Some may say that a comment like that makes me into a cooking snob.  Guilty as charged, I guess.)  However, the end product is delicious, and you can't make this dessert without using some heat-producing device or other.

This recipe came from cooks.com, which appears to have somewhere around three billion recipes for grasshopper pie.  I had printed it off many years ago and pasted it into my binder of dessert recipe clippings.  A short search to try to find it again online so that I could provide link to it was unsuccessful, so just know that I'm not taking any credit for this one at all.

You'll need the following ingredients:

1 lb. marshmallows
1/2 c. milk
18 chocolate sandwich cookies (We splurged and bought real Oreos®.)
3 Tblsp. butter
1 1/2 c. heavy cream
1/4 c. Creme de Menthe
3 Tblsp. Creme de Cacao
Andes mints for garnish

1. The first thing to do is to melt the pound of marshmallows with the 1/2 c. of milk.  My copy of the recipe even says right on it "can be done in microwave," but I decided to do this the old-fashioned way and melt them in the top of a double-boiler.  I can remember my mom and Meme doing this when they made Rice Krispie Treats®.  I started them directly over the fire, but ended up moving them to a cooler spot to just keep the water at a simmer rather than a rolling boil.  The marshmallows may begin to stick a little if the water below them is boiling too hard.


2. While the marshmallows are melting, melt the three tablespoons of butter in the warming oven or on top of the water reservoir.  I used the warming oven this time.



3. As the marshmallows melt, stir them occasionally to speed the process and to mix in the milk.



4. When you can no longer see any marshmallow lumps, remove the top part of the double boiler to a trivet to cool completely.

5. At about the time the marshmallows are melted, the butter should be melted too.  Crush the Oreo® cookies using either a rolling pin or a food processor.  I was in a hurry, so I used the food processor, and I have to admit that I think that machine is great.  Mix the 3 Tbsp. melted butter into the cookie crumbs and pour them into a nine-inch pie plate.


6. I used another pie plate that was the same size to quickly press the crumbs into a crust.


7. Once the crust is ready, the next step is to whip the cup and a half of cream until it is stiff.

I took a picture of some of the ingredients because I laugh when
I think about the two bottles of liqueur.  The other teachers at
school make fun of me because I got these two bottles in 1997
when Club 64, a steakhouse where I was working, closed.  I was
the one who cleaned out the bar, and the owners let me take home
a few bottles of things that I knew would be valuable for cooking.
I still have all of the bottles except the bottle of sherry which only
had about a cup in it.  The six bottles and a couple of bottles of
wine we have received as gifts over the years constitute the
entirety of the alcohol around here.

8. Add the cooled melted marshmallow/milk mixture to the whipped cream.   Add the liqueurs and mix thoroughly.

The entire filling mixture being combined in the mixture.

9. Pour the mixture into the prepared crust.  Then decorate with Andes Mint® shavings and put the whole thing in the freezer.


10.  Just before serving, melt the rest of the Andes Mints® with a little cream and butter to make a chocolate mint sauce.  If you have a steady fire burning in the range when you do this, be sure to keep the pot as far away from the fire as possible.  You want to have only a gentle heat for melting chocolate.



11. When serving, drizzle a little of the melted chocolate mixture over each piece of the grasshopper pie.


Just an FYI: When I made the pie in the pictures above, I actually made two pies, and used the microwave to melt the marshmallows for the other one.  I don't know why, but the marshmallows melted in the double boiler were much fluffier and gave the nice volume to the filling that you see above.  Those melted in the microwave were runny, and the pie was consequently a little less attractive.  Of course, flavor was not affected at all.

This is one of Nancy's favorite desserts, and I hope you all enjoy it!



Wednesday, April 25, 2018

A Blog Reader's Cookstove - VI


One of the things I really enjoy about maintaining this blog is the opportunities to converse with other wood cookstove cooks.  One such cook is Nancy from west central Missouri.  I feel I have a special bond with her because her wood cookstove is a Qualified Range, the same make as the first cookstove that I purchased back in January of 1997.  The only differences are that hers is black instead of white, and her stove is equipped with a water reservoir.

I asked Nancy if she would be willing to have a Reader's Cookstove Post written about her Qualified, and she has generously agreed.  I sent her my standard questions, and her replies are below with nice pictures of her stove.

Nancy's Qualified range in west central Missouri.  The handles on the
front of the stove appear to have been replaced at some point.  Certainly
those on the oven and storage drawer are not original, but the rest of the
stove appears to be in great shape.

1. What was the reason you purchased this particular make and model of cookstove?

"I’ve wanted a wood cookstove ever since I first laid eyes on one many years ago. I’d always been interested in things that were old-fashioned and in time came to feel that it made sense to have one. 

"We made many moves over the years, so I wasn’t able to pursue finding one. About ten years ago we moved to a place where we felt we would be staying for a while so I began thinking about one again. The house we lived in was small but we planned to build a summer kitchen and put it in there. Our budget was small, too, so I looked for a used one. 

"One day, we were with some friends at an Amish general store. Our friends knew the owner and knew I’d been looking for one, so they suggested that I ask if he knew of a stove for sale. He said, yes, he had one in the storage shed behind his house. We took a look, asked the price, and said we’d get back to him. It was a Qualified range. They had purchased a new airtight stove to replace it. We went home and thought about it for a while and decided to go ahead and get it even though we didn’t have a place for it yet. It sat in our brooder house for a while until we moved to a different farm where the house had two chimneys with the opening going into one of them in the kitchen. We were finally able to set it up!"

The heat shield that protects the wall behind the stove is cool!

I asked Nancy how long "a while" was that the stove sat in the brooder house.  She said that they had the stove for two years, and then they moved to their present home where the stove sat in the kitchen for another couple of years before they were able to complete their installation.  God has blessed Nancy with amazing patience!

2. Nancy's favorite feature of her range is its spacious cooktop with four lids and a blank plate.  I would have to agree with her there.  The cooktops on Qualified Ranges have more depth than many other models, so they accommodate large pots and pans easily.

3. When asked what she might change about her stove, Nancy mentioned the oven size.  

"Even though the oven is good-sized, when I first saw it, it appeared small. I was used to large conventional ovens [like in a modern 30-inch range]. When I thought about it, I realized that it would be a rare occasion when the space in a conventional oven would be filled up. (Like when our home-raised turkeys dress out at 36 lbs.๐Ÿ˜€) Its usually just more area to have to heat."

Nancy's assessment of the oven situation is correct.  As the ovens on more recent models of wood cookstoves go, the Qualified's oven is not small.  Before purchasing mine, I measured all of my largest baking pans and roasters, and everything I had would fit.  When considering a wood cookstove, it is also important to remember that much of the size of a modern oven is in its height.  This is actually the least important dimension; width and depth are what really make an oven have more usable space.

4. How much of your home heating does your wood cookstove do?

"Other than when the power has gone out, we have only supplemented our forced-air heat with it. (How great it was when the power was out!) Because of our floor plan we are unable to heat the whole house with it. It does heat the large kitchen area very well, and we so appreciate the good warmth it gives when we come in from doing chores. It really warms you in a way that other heat just can’t."




Nancy went on to say the following:

"Not knowing a lot about the different stoves, and nothing about Qualifieds, I wasn’t sure what we had. It seems to be a well-made stove and I’ve read favorable comments about them. While I always envisioned a more ornate old-fashioned looking stove, my husband really likes the looks of it."

I second Nancy's comment about the workmanship on the Qualified ranges.  Mine was purchased from Lehman Hardware via mail order in 1997.  I had not had a chance to look at any new cookstoves in person before it arrived.  In the fall of 2000, I took a short vacation to visit Lehman Hardware in person and spent hours in the stove department very thoroughly examining all of the ranges that I had only read about, and the more I saw, the more pleased I was with the Qualified at home.

I hope Nancy and her husband get to enjoy their Qualified range for many years to come and that she will feel free to comment frequently on this blog.  She finished her e-mail with the words below, which echo the sentiments of so many wood cookstove users!

"It has been a big blessing for us and a long-time dream come true. Wood cook stoves really are the 'Queens of the Kitchen.'"


Thursday, April 12, 2018

A Single Sentence about Cookstoves

Today I am substituting as the media specialist at the school where I used to teach full-time.  I truly enjoy substituting for the media specialist, but my love of books is a complete handicap to any speed I might develop when it comes to managing circulation.  One of the students asked me how my day was going this afternoon, and I had to honestly admit that I'm kind of exhausted because I'm trying to read as many books as possible.  Today I may have actually mastered the art of speed reading/skimming a novel--a talent I have developed about 25 years too late for it to be as useful as it would have been when I was in college.

Then while I was dusting shelves in the high school library, I ran across the 1970 history book which was written to honor Shelby, Iowa's centennial.  I student-taught in Shelby over twenty years ago, and I have always enjoyed the town, so I pulled the book off the shelf and thumbed through it.

Smack in the middle of the book, I ran across a picture of a lady standing at a woodburning cookstove.  I think it is a stock picture that I've seen before, but the text that goes with it is fun.  It is entitled "LONGEST SENTENCE IN THE BOOK."  And I quote:

     "The old cook stove was the most versatile of all household possessions, for it cooked our food; baked our bread; heated water for washing, butchering, dishes, family baths and general cleaning; heated our flat irons; rendered our lard; made our soap; canned our meat, fruit and vegetables; made jams and jellies in season; heated the kitchen; dried the clothes; warmed up new born pigs; dried off baby chickens caught in the rain; warmed a chilled foot or two; popped our corn; made our candy; kept the teakettle boiling to humidify the house; burned our trash and utilized cobs and wood raised on the farm."

. . . and they still can today.


Friday, April 6, 2018

Will Somebody Please Explain This One?

All right.  First, let me just remind you that I spend WAY TOO MUCH TIME trolling about on Craigslist and eBay keeping track of the wood and coal cookstoves that are for sale.  Truly, I'm kind of embarrassed by this habit, but I learn a lot this way, too.  Not only do I get to see some really interesting vintage ranges, but I also am fascinated by the occasional glimpse at the way other people have incorporated a woodburning cookstove into their kitchen design.

However, I ran across something this week that has me scratching my head.  You all saw the picture of the Hayes-Custer stove that I acquired a few weeks ago:






Now check out this stove near Iron River, Wisconsin, near Eau Claire, that I found at this link:

https://eauclaire.craigslist.org/atq/d/antique-wood-stove/6536706027.html





The text with the ad says that this is a Marshall-Wells stove, but you can clearly see that the design is exactly the same as the Hayes-Custer.  This one is equipped with the warming oven, and instead of a large blank plate to the right of the firebox, this cooktop has four additional lids, but these were usually features that buyers could opt for if they wished to spend a little more money.

So what happened here?

At the Rochelle Gridley website entitled "100 Years Ago in the Pantagraph," where I found some of my information for my last post, the following sentence appears:

"After the 1929 fire the Association of Commerce gave some aid to help the company get on its feet again, but in 1936 the Hayes Custer Company accepted a contract with a mail order company that turned out to be a very bad deal for Hayes Custer and the contract was abrogated by a court, ending the company's operations outside the bankruptcy court."

Was Marshall-Wells that mail order company?

Another guess is that once Hayes-Custer went out of business, they sold their design specs to Marshall-Wells in Duluth.  But that is just a guess.  (The plans for the "Qualified Range" went through several foundries like that, the last one that I know of being the Hitzer Company in Indiana.)  Marshall-Wells sold woodburning cookstoves for a number of years after this one, manufacturing some really nice-looking white cabinet style models later on.  However, it could also be that Hayes-Custer built cookstoves for Marshall-Wells who simply put its name on the product.  Once Hayes-Custer went out of business, Marshall-Wells could have switched foundries.

Can anyone clear this up for me?  I'm really curious now.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Hayes-Custer Stove Company of Bloomington, Illinois

A couple weeks ago I learned about a stove manufacturing company that I'd never heard of before.  This doesn't happen to me very often anymore, and it certainly piques my interest when it does.

In today's world, you could walk into an appliance store in Maine, Florida, Iowa, California, or Washington and pretty much count on the fact that the brands of ranges represented in each area of the country will all be the same.  You will see General Electric, Whirlpool, Maytag, Kenmore, LG, and Frigidaire pretty much everywhere.  However, in earlier days, the brands of stoves available for retail sale varied by the different geographic areas of the country.

Of course, mail order houses such as Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward, as well as Kalamazoo, whose motto was "A Kalamazoo - Direct to You," shipped their stoves all over the nation.  The Glenwoods, Clarions, and Crawfords that are so popular in the New England states only migrated west in later years and are still almost unheard of here.

Woodburning cookstoves found most frequently in our area of the country include Majestic, Copper Clad, Monarch, Riverside, and Home Comfort.  The Majestic Manufacturing Company was located in St. Louis, Missouri, which was also home to the Wrought Iron Range Company, who made Home Comfort cookstoves.  Riverside stoves were made by the Rock Island Stove Company of Rock Island, Illinois.

After much research, I would like someone smarter than I to clarify whether the Copper Clad and Monarch cookstoves were made by the same company.  I know that Monarch ranges were made by the Malleable Iron Range Company in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.  Further, from what I have been able to learn, the Copper Clad ranges were made by the Malleable Range Company, but some sources indicate that the two companies were the same.  Can anyone tell me whether that is true?  The stoves seem radically different to me, so I'm having difficulty believing that the two stove manufacturers were really the same.

At any rate, I had never heard of the Hayes-Custer Stove Company of Bloomington, Illinois, until finding their name on the firebox door of the cookstove that I had gone to look at from a Craigslist ad.  This prompted me to do a little research.

I have been unable to determine exactly when the Hayes-Custer Stove Company came into being.  It was in business for sure in 1928 when a March 6th issue of The Pantograph spoke about the company's assets being raised from $100,000 to $150,000.  At that time the president of the company was John W. Hayes, the vice-president was Charles Custer, and the Hayes family rounded out the company's officers with Paul W. Hayes and Louis A. Hayes serving as secretary and treasurer respectively.

Unfortunately, the company did not make it through the Great Depression, closing its doors in 1937 and being auctioned off in 1940.

Hunting for images of the Hayes-Custer Stove Company yielded the following photographs.

Men working on assembling heating stoves at the Hayes-Custer
Stove Company in 1933.  Photo courtesy of the McClean County
Museum of History.


This photograph is also from the McLean County Museum's Facebook page.  You can visit it here.  This photograph is dated February 1936.


This picture got me to thinking about another wood cookstove that I have written about on this blog.  It was one we saw in Seymour, Iowa, while on vacation near there on a visit to my sister-in-law.  At the time I wrote that post, I said that I had looked this stove all over for a brand name.  I'd say that mystery is solved!


The Hayes-Custer cookstove with a high oven that I saw in
Seymour, Iowa.
I am still completely fascinated by this cookstove design with the high oven.  I hope someday I will get the chance to try cooking on one of them.  I wonder if this stove is still in existence somewhere.  For now, I'm extremely glad to have figured out the brand name for the stove above and am looking forward to getting the Hayes-Custer that I now have up and running.




Thursday, March 15, 2018

Latest Cookstove Acquisition: A Hayes-Custer


Okay.  I spend WAY too much time trolling about eBay and Craigslist looking at the wood/coal cookstoves that are for sale on those sites.  But I learn a lot, and sometimes I run across some real finds.

The woodburning range you see in the pictures below was advertised on Craigslist.  Very little was said in the description except that it needed to be moved ASAP as the owners were remodeling their basement, and the contact telephone number shared our area code, so I thought there was a chance that it was fairly near us.

I contacted the person who placed the ad.  The stove was fairly near, so I scheduled a time to go and investigate.

One of the pictures of the Hayes-Custer cookstove from the Craigslist advertisement.

The house was built in the 1950s, and the stove has probably been in the basement from the beginning.  Kevin, the owner, lived in the house during part of his youth, and he remembered a particularly bad winter storm that put their electricity out for a period of about a week.  During that time, the stove was put back into service, but even though it was connected to a chimney until just before the basement remodel began, it had not been used since then.  

Since the stove had spent all of this time in a dry basement, it was in remarkable shape.  After a thorough examination, the most major problem I could find was that the lid-lifter notch in the "T" over the firebox had rusted, burned, or worn through; and one of the cast iron tabs which cover the holes where water pipes would pass through the wall of the firebox was broken, but everything else was in great shape.

 1
The other picture of the Hayes-Custer cookstove  from the Craigslist ad.


You can see from the picture above, that there is no brand identification on the front of the stove, and even the oven thermometer merely indicated that the stove was American.  Furthermore, the design of the stove didn't immediately give away its brand either.  Kalamazoo ranges, for example, never had a brand insignia visible on the front of the stove either, but their familiar appearance gave away their identity at first glance.  It wasn't until I opened the left door that I saw on the interior cast iron firebox door the words "Hayes-Custer, Bloomington."  I'd never heard of the Hayes-Custer Stove Company, and it is rare that I run across a brand of stove that I'm unfamiliar with!  More on the Hayes-Custer Company will be coming in a later post.

Kevin said that he'd had other people who were interested in the stove, but no one wanted to tackle the project of getting the stove up out of the basement.

"That's why I'm giving it away," he added.

Wow!  The price was right!

I wasn't too excited about getting it removed from the basement either, but my dad and I had hauled a Kenmore cookstove out of a neighbor's basement when I was in high school, so I had an idea about how it could be done.  The price tag caused me to be suddenly motivated, too!

I knew that my family members wouldn't be too excited about helping to haul a stove out of a basement, but my advantage is that I know some really strong high school boys, and the stove was located much closer to them than my relatives.  I told Kevin that I would see what I could do about lining up a removal crew and get back to him.

Well, Kevin was anxious to get the stove out of his basement.  He made sure that the other most interested party was not coming for the stove, and then he called me back on the same day that I had convinced a junior boy to round up some of his friends to help me out.

On Monday of this week, I returned to Kevin's and disassembled the stove.  Everything came apart easily except the bolts that held the two shelf brackets to the stovetop.  In my experience, these bolts are often problematic for three reasons: a) access to them is often difficult because you can't get a straight shot at them from the top, b) food splatters have often landed on them, making them sticky, and c) they have been exposed to a lot of expansion and contraction due to temperature fluctuation.  We ended up having to sacrifice those two bolts, which had to be done quite carefully so as not to damage anything else.

Then, Tuesday evening the high school boys came, and we carried the stove up the stairs, out of the house, and into the pickup.  The main body of the stove was heavy, but not too bad really, and everything traveled very easily.


The disassembled stove in the back of the pickup in our driveway.

So now the question Nancy asks is what I will do with this stove.  It's a good question, too.

This stove is in better condition than the green and cream Riverside Bakewell out in our summer kitchen, especially since its oven door hinge broke.

The broken oven hinge on the Riverside Bakewell.


Thus, at this moment, I'm considering selling the Riverside Bakewell and using this stove in its place.  The only hang-up is that the Riverside has a warming oven, and the Hayes-Custer only has a high shelf.  Other than that, the two stoves are very similar.  Oven size, firebox size, and reservoir capacity are nearly identical.  Both stovetops have just two eyes over the firebox, but one thing that I consider an advantage about the Hayes-Custer is that the rest of the stovetop consists of just one French plate to the right of the firebox rather than two like the Riverside has.  This is an advantage because the joint between the two plates on the Riverside is not perfectly even, causing larger kettles to not heat as evenly as they might.

Even so, the warming oven is a big plus.

What do any of you readers think you'd do?  Anyone interested in purchasing a green and cream Riverside Bakewell?

Sunday, February 25, 2018

Cream Puffs: An Ideal Wood Cookstove Dessert

Cream puffs are one of my favorite desserts, and they are an ideal recipe for the wood cookstove.  If your chickens are like ours and the lengthening days have resulted in increased egg production, cream puffs are also a great food to make during this time of year.  For one thing, the weather has not gotten warm yet.  This allows the cream puffs to keep better, and standing over the stove while you make the filling is still a pleasant experience.

Cream puffs are very simple, and if you have your own chickens and a dairy cow or goat, you can produce a great deal of the ingredients for them on your own.  Here is what you will need:



1 cup water
1/2 cup cold butter
1 cup flour
4 eggs

1. The first thing to do is to build your fire so that you will have a hot oven (400ยบ F).  As you do this, keep in mind that your baking time is going to be 45 minutes long.  I find that it is best to have a lot of pieces of firewood that are small in diameter.

2. Once the top of the stove has gotten good and hot, put the water and the butter in a medium saucepan and place it directly over the fire.  You want to bring this mixture to a full boil.

Note: I find that I have better results when the butter is cold when I put it in the water.  I don't know why, but it seems to make a difference.



3. While the water and butter are coming to a boil, crack four eggs into a measuring cup and measure your flour.  This is also a good time to grease the cookie sheet you will bake these on.

4. Once the water/butter mixture has come to a full boil and the butter is completely melted, take the pan off the fire and immediately stir in one cup of flour.  This will make a paste that smells awful and doesn't really look very nice either.



5. Stir the eggs into the paste one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition.  Do this quickly because you don't want the eggs to cook before you've beaten them in.  Now your paste will be a sticky, bright yellow goop that still looks and smells unappetizing.





6. Drop or pipe the puff paste onto the greased cookie sheet.  You can make these as big as you want.  In stores, they seem to always be bitesized.  I tend to prefer a more bold cream puff, so I drop them by the 1/4 cup.  



7. Bake in a hot oven for 35-45 minutes, watching to be sure that the edges aren't turning too dark.  

If you are going to fill the cream puffs with a cooked custard, it is best to cook it during this time because your stove is already hot for the baking. My favorite filling is my great-grandma Gladys's vanilla cornstarch pudding. You can find the recipe here.



7. When done, remove from the oven and cool completely.

8. To serve, either slice the cream puff in half to insert the filling, or you may use a pastry gun to squirt the filling inside the cream puff.  I like to sprinkle powdered sugar over the top, but for fancier occasions, I have diluted strawberry jam with strawberry syrup and drizzled that on top of the cream puff and then dusted it all with the powdered sugar.  I know I'm weird, but I also like my cream puffs warm, so I often pop them in the microwave for a few seconds before eating them.  


I consider cream puffs an excellent wood cookstove recipe because you take advantage of the heat of the fire to make the paste while your oven is heating, and then while they are baking, you again make double use of the fire by making the custard filling.  Really, your fire is always serving a double purpose as you make these.  Also, with the exception of the butter, these are a very economical but fancy dessert.



Note: This is the same recipe for eclairs.  The difference is that eclairs are usually piped onto the cookie sheet in oblong shapes, and they have chocolate on the top.