Saturday, September 23, 2017

Cheating with Your Wood Cookstove: Creamed Chicken over Biscuits

I don't remember exactly when my mom started making creamed chicken over biscuits, but I remember that I was not a little kid anymore, that it was an instant hit, and that I wondered why she hadn't tried it on us earlier.  Of course, maybe it was all very strategic.  If she had served it to us too early, our palates wouldn't have been developed well enough to fully appreciate the pleasure of this stick-to-your ribs dish, and we might have summarily rejected it as we did with several more "grown up" foods that she tried on us.  She likes to tell people how long her list of recipes-to-try-again-when-the-kids-are-gone was when we were young.

At any rate, it was Mom who initially got me hooked on this entree.  My mother-in-law also has her family hooked on her version of Creamed Chicken over Biscuits, but her method for making it is entirely different.  Both recipes are delicious, but in this post I'm going to share my mom's version.  

You can see from the labels on this post, that this is a dish made from leftovers.  Therefore, prior to this meal, you need to have roasted a chicken (to read about one way to do that in a wood cookstove click here) and made gravy from the drippings.  We had several people in my family as guests for a Sunday dinner back in August and served a roasted chicken with all the trimmings.  After the meal, Nancy picked the leftover chicken off the bones, and we saved the leftover gravy too.  A few days later, we made Creamed Chicken over Biscuits.

The first thing to do is to build a really hot fire.  Biscuits bake best in a quick oven, and so I always use a lot of little sticks, or "biscuit wood," to accomplish this.

The hot fire built of "biscuit wood" in the Margin Gem wood
cookstove.
 
To make biscuits, I used to always cut the shortening into the flour, but I've taken to a different method of incorporating shortening that my friend Leah told me about.  Now, while the oven is heating, I melt my shortening on the stove.  Sometimes I use the warming oven, other times the lid of the reservoir--wherever I think the heat will be sufficient.  This time I used a very small saucepan on the top of the stove.  I melted perhaps a 1/3 cup of Crisco.



While the shortening is melting, sift two cups of flour into a mixing bowl and add around a tablespoon of baking powder to it.  At this point you might sprinkle a little salt in too if you wish.  Mix all the dry ingredients together.

Once the shortening has melted, pour it into a heat-proof measuring cup. Then add enough cold milk or buttermilk to make one cup altogether while stirring constantly.  The coldness of the liquid causes the shortening to congeal again, thus allowing it to be evenly incorporated into your flour. Brilliant!  (I hate washing the pastry blender.)


Pour the buttermilk/shortening mixture over the flour mixture and toss lightly to mix.  Don't work the dough too hard as that will make for tough biscuits later!




Turn the dough out onto a floured board.



Knead the dough a few times, then pat out until it is about an inch thick.


Cut the biscuits in the shape and size you desire.  For many years I cut biscuits with an old metal drinking glass that Gramps kept by the utility room sink when our house was still his home.  The problem was that cutting the biscuits resulted in compressing the air in the glass, and sometimes it would "burp," causing the biscuit to become misshapen.  Last year, one of the fundraisers at school had a set of biscuit cutters on it, and I'm very pleased with my four various sized biscuit cutters.

Six beautifully cut biscuits and one not so beautiful because
it is the trimmings patted together.

Let the biscuits rest for at least five minutes.  The baking powder will cause them to rise a little, and they will be nice and light.

The next step is to put together the creamed chicken.  Here is where this recipe really qualifies as what I would call "cheating."  To whatever leftover gravy you have from the roast chicken dinner, add a can of cream of chicken soup.  Add whatever leftover chicken you have to the gravy/soup mixture.





Pop the biscuits into the hot oven now.




Put the chicken/gravy/soup mixture on the stove to come to a boil.  You probably won't want to put this right over the firebox since your fire will be so hot for baking the biscuits.  You can see in the picture below that mine was closer to the reservoir than to the fire.

If the gravy was quite thick, you may need to add a little water or milk. Don't do this until you've had a chance to warm the gravy/soup mixture, though, because leftover gravy congeals in the refrigerator and may look deceptively thick until it is heated through.


The soup/gravy/chicken combination coming to a boil over
gentle heat.
Once the creamed chicken has come to a good boil, move it to a place where it can be kept hot while your biscuits finish baking.

The biscuits finishing up in the oven while the
creamed chicken is staying warm on a simmering
pad on the back of the range.
To serve, pour the creamed chicken over the biscuits and enjoy.  I like to drizzle a bit of honey over the top of it all.

The finished product.

Notes:
 
1. You could make your own white sauce instead of using the can of cream of chicken soup.  Then this recipe is no longer cheating.
 
2. My favorite side dish for this is peas, which I like to mix into the creamed chicken mixture.  Peas are not Nancy's favorite side dish, though, so you don't see them in the picture.
 
3. As with most chicken recipes, turkey can be substituted in this dish, and this is one of our family's favorite post-Thanksgiving meals.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Cookstove Road Trip to Mill Creek Antiques in Paxico, Kansas

Nancy had a total replacement done on her left knee in June, and she is having the right one done as I type this post.  Since she spent most of the summer recovering from the first surgery and since her recovery used up her vacation time, we didn't take any vacation this summer.  Instead, we've opted for a couple of day trips.

On Labor Day, we went to Jamesport, Missouri, which has a large Amish settlement.  We only saw one cookstove, a small Windsor that was a decoration in a cheese shop.  There was a cookstove dealer in the area, and after a few wrong turns we were able to locate his shop.  He did not have any cookstoves on display, however, as he mostly sets up direct shipments from manufacturer to buyer.  In the course of visiting with him, he told me that in the last seven or eight years, their settlement began allowing the use of propane cooking stoves, so most of the younger Amish families used them for their cooking now.  This was no surprise to me since I've noticed this trend in other Amish areas that we have visited.

Last Saturday, we trekked to Paxico, Kansas, to visit Mill Creek Antiques.  To my knowledge, this is the antique stove store that is closest to us. Neither of us had ever been there before, but it is a most impressive place, and I am already looking forward to going back.

Storeowner and expert stove restorer Steve Hund was on hand at the store as well as his very personable and entertaining assistant salesman, whose name I'm embarrassed to have forgotten.  I have been in a lot of antique stores, but this one was extraordinary in that it is not cluttered up with the usual run of mid-twentieth century glassware and bric-a-brac.  Further, the store is set up to feel much more like you've walked back into time and are shopping in an old fashioned stove and furniture shop.

When we walked in the front door, we took an immediate left and saw several period gas stoves, but the salesman directed our attention to an Acorn combination range that was extremely unique.  The only other Acorn cookstove that I've been in contact with is discussed in this post about the wood cookstoves at Living History Farms in the Des Moines area.  Acorn manufactured quality stoves, but the one we saw in Paxico was fascinating. This was the view that we had when we walked into the room.  You can see the gas cooktop and the high gas oven stack on the right.

The Acorn combination gas/wood cookstove.



I could see that there is a wood or coal burning firebox on the lower left with an oven to the right.


The salesman pointing out where the grate shaker
is located while I snapped a view of the left side
of the stove.

Then the salesman showed me one of the most surprising features of a stove I have ever seen.  The gas cooktop was hinged so that when you wish to cook on solid fuel, you just fold the gas cooktop into the back splash, revealing the second cooktop!  I had never seen anything like it.

The Acorn combination stove with the gas cooktop
latched in the up position.

Interior shot of the long, narrow oven which is heated by the
wood or coal fire.

The room with the Acorn had two toy wood cookstoves in it, which I took a couple of quick snaps of.





Then we traveled to the main stove room, which was just beautiful.

The main stove display room.  If I'd have been
thinking at all, I would have shot this in black
and white because then it would have been hard
to tell this photo from one of those period
pictures you see of hardware stores in the past.

Of course, I was immediately drawn to the Majestic cookstove in the right rear part of the room.  You can't imagine my delight at finding that a fire had been lit in it, and a round link of homemade German sausage was cooking. This stove is gorgeous, and my photograph does not begin to do it justice. For one thing, you cannot see how the nickel plating gleams.  This stove is ready to turn out many more delicious meals while gracing whatever kitchen it lands in.

The Great Majestic cookstove with its firebox door
open to show the fire.  The sausage link is cooking
in the pan over the fire.  I wish you could see how
shiny this stove is.

Other cookstoves in this room included the ones below, all ready to begin cooking again.

A Monarch range.  My guess is that this stove is
from the 20s or early 30s.  This stove looks like it
may be the same model that blog reader Tim in
Minnesota has.  Tim's post can be read here.

A cute, smaller, later model Majestic than the
one that had the fire in it.

This stove is listed on Mill Creek Antiques'
website as a Malleable Cookstove.  The right
side of this stove used to have four gas burners,
but they have been replaced with a big piece
 of cast iron to make a convenient, heat safe
work surface.  The gas oven and broiler are
above.

A Home Comfort Range with a stovepipe oven resting
on its cooktop.  Home Comforts had reputations as
real work horses, and many of them are still in regular
use today.

One thing I would like to add about the stoves being sold at Mill Creek Antiques is that I felt the pricing was quite reasonable for the quality work that each stove exhibits.  A short conversation with owner/restorer Steve Hund assured me that he knows exactly what he is doing when it comes to stove restorations, and his 40+ years of experience make him a valuable resource for information.

In addition to stoves, Mill Creek Antiques carries high quality antique furniture, most of which is quite unique.  They are also an Aladdin Lamps Authorized Dealer, and they carry a huge selection of flat wick antique oil lamps and other light fixtures.

Paxico has a number of other antique stores in its small business district, but I don't think any of the other store owners would argue with me when I say that Mill Creek Antiques is the town's crown jewel.  Nancy and I are already looking forward to our next trip to Paxico.  I hope it will be in the dead of winter when the store's many heating stoves will be in use!


Monday, September 4, 2017

It Can Be Done: Using Two Pressure Canners Simultaneously on a Wood Cookstove

I had wondered.

I had plotted and planned.

I had reasoned and pondered.

But I did not know whether it would work.

I'm here now to tell you that it can be done.  You can can  (see what I did there?) in two different pressure canners at the same time on a wood cookstove!

You might be wondering why this is a big deal, especially since one could easily can in two different pressure canners on most modern ranges and since it is not difficult to pressure can with a single canner on a wood cookstove.  (See my initial post about that here.)  To understand the significance of my discovery, you have to remember that to adjust the heat when you are cooking on a woodburning range, you move your cooking vessel closer to or away from the fire.  It is not as simple as turning a pair of dials.  Furthermore, as soon as a pressure canner has reached the necessary pressure, you must reduce the heat in order to maintain the adequate pressure without having it continue to climb.  Thus, I wasn't sure that it would be possible to move two very large canners across the top of the stove in order to accurately maintain the pressure in both of them.  But it worked!  Let me tell you how it went.

First, you need to know that one of the canners that I was using is a weighted gauge canner, and the other has a dial gauge.  This is very important.  I'm not going to go into all the details about the difference between the two types of canners here because you can find that information in many other places on the Internet.  However, it is important to know that a weighted gauge canner releases any extra pressure from the inside of the canner, while a dial gauge canner does not.

To be sure that you are maintaining adequate pressure in our weighted gauge canner, the weight must jiggle at least three to four times per minute.  This is much easier to manage than keeping our dial gauge canner at 11 pounds of pressure, which is the amount that I use because of our elevation.  Therefore, I started the weighted gauge canner first.

Always at the beginning of the pressure canning process, I have a raging fire going.  This is particularly easy to do when you are using summer fuel.  To retain as much of the nutrient value of the food being canned as well as the physical quality of the food, you want to keep the total time that the food is in the canner to a minimum.  Thus, you want the raging fire so that the canner reaches the desired pressure as quickly as possible.

Now, a big teakettle is an integral part of the canning process because you need boiling water to pour over the food inside the jars.  For that reason, when your fire is first started, the teakettle is perched directly over the firebox.  A small saucepan with your canning lids covered by hot water is placed far away from the firebox so that they stay hot but do not boil.  I put the kettle portion of the canner with the necessary water inside it on the middle part of the cooktop to heat the water.  This way, you reduce the risk of jars breaking if a hot jar of food and boiling water makes contact with cold water in the bottom of the canner.

Once the weighted gauge canner was loaded, I put the lid on it, and it was moved so that it sat directly over the firebox to begin building pressure.  More water was put into the teakettle, and it was also put over the firebox so that it could come back to a boil in order to fill the jars in the second canner (Sorry!  I forgot to get a picture of these first steps.)  The second canner was also put on the middle of the stovetop so that it could begin getting hot.

By the time the weighted gauge canner had reached the correct pressure and the weight had begun to jiggle, the dial gauge canner was loaded, so I switched the locations of the two canners so that the dial gauge was now directly over the fire and the weighted gauge was in the middle of the cooktop and began counting the canning time for the weighted gauge canner.  I snapped a photo of that, so it will be easier for you to understand what I'm talking about now.


Two pressure canners on the wood cookstove.
You can see the weighted gauge canner on the
right.  It had reached pressure before this photo
was snapped.  On the left is the dial gauge canner.
It has already exhausted; if you zoom in on the
picture, you can see that it is at about seven pounds
of pressure at this point.  The small saucepan in
front of the canners is filled with the beans that
were too many to cram into the jars but not enough
for an additional jar.  I cooked them so that they
would just have to be warmed up for Sunday dinner.
On the back right side is a 16-quart kettle filled with
tomatoes and onions cooking down for homemade
ketchup.
Once the dial gauge canner reached the desired pressure, "the dance" began.  I call it a dance because you have to move the canner around until you find that sweet spot that maintains the correct pressure.  You can see that I moved the weighted gauge canner back over the firebox, but I offset it quite a ways so that it wasn't receiving the full heat of the fire.  The dial gauge canner took a trip to the far right.

At this point in the process on this particular evening, I quit adding fuel to the fire because I knew I was not going to can anything more.  So, in the next two pictures, you will see the dial gauge canner slowly migrating closer to the firebox in order to maintain its pressure.  The weighted gauge canner was quite happy to stay right where it was for the duration of the canning time.  Its weight jiggled more than three to four times a minute, but that is all right.  It didn't jiggle constantly, and because of the way that the weighted gauge canner works, it was maintaining the correct pressure on its own.



The weighted gauge canner completed its canning time first and was removed from the stove to cool on top of our modern gas stove just to the right of the wood cookstove.  The dial gauge canner then remained on the wood cookstove for a little longer to reach its specified time.


I was extremely pleased at how easily this worked, and I'm looking forward to doing it again sometime.  It certainly increases the efficiency of the canning process when one fire can do so much!

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Life Changes Update and a "Mild-Mouthed Midwesterner" Recipe for Creamed Peas and New Potatoes

Hello, my long-neglected blog readers!  It's been a long time since my last post, and I've got so much to tell you that I'd better jump right in.

First and foremost, I resigned from full-time teaching at the end of the school year this spring.  It was a decision that was a long time coming, and a lot of thought went into it.  I want to make it abundantly clear that the students were not the reason for my resignation.  I was still very much enjoying the kids, and I still love English.  However, I realized that I was no longer interested in becoming a better teacher than I was, and I felt that it was unfair to the kids for me to continue teaching.  So, after twelve years in the classroom and a total of fourteen years in education, I have now changed my role to that of a substitute teacher, and so far I am ridiculously happy.

This summer hasn't felt much different than any of the other summers between school years.  Notable exceptions have been that Nancy had her left knee replaced on June 5th (her right one is scheduled for Sept. 11).  After the operation, the surgeon told her parents and me that she had the knees of a seventy-year-old.  That is bad news for a person who is only in her mid-forties!  As a result, I've learned a lot about nursing, and we've both learned a lot about physical therapy.  The recovery process has been slow and agonizing for her at times, but at least there is marked improvement.

The other big exception has been that I've taken the time to raise a beautiful vegetable garden this summer.  Historically, I've always planted a garden (there is something in my genetic makeup which compels me to plant each spring), but I haven't usually taken the time to maintain it as well as I ought.  This year, I've spent a great deal of time actually taking care of the garden, and my efforts have been rewarded.  I'm even more excited about next year's gardening season because I will be able to plant in a more timely fashion because I won't be so distracted by full-time school responsibilities.

With the beginning of the school year, I've felt the change in careers more keenly, but I'm even more convinced that God led me to the right decision.  I have started substitute teaching, which I've enjoyed very much so far.  Subbing has afforded me the opportunity to keep up with the students in whose lives I feel quite invested.

Of course, substitute teaching will not necessarily be an everyday occurrence for me, and that is good because I would like to eventually be able to make my contribution to our household finances through freelance writing and editing.  Toward that end, I've done a little freelance editing through Upwork, and I have a monologue suitable for speech contest use available for sale here at Brooklyn Publishers. 

I also hope to be able to do a great deal more blogging.  Those of you who are longtime blog readers have heard me say this before and then have gone for long stretches of time without seeing posts.  You must help me remain accountable, please.  You will notice (I hope) that I have also "monetized" my blog in order to try to use it to supplement my income.  We'll see how that goes.

Enough with all of that; let's get to the recipe! 

The August weather in Southwest Iowa has been beautiful, so I'm back to cooking on wood (not exclusively yet, but I'm hoping for next week).  The recipe that I'd like to share tonight is one that comes from Nancy's grandma Ruth.  Nancy has been telling me for thirteen years that the only way she likes to eat peas is the way her grandmother fixed them in Creamed Peas and New Potatoes.  I really think that Ruth probably served this side dish in June when the garden peas are typically ready here, but this is a good recipe to help you use up those little potatoes that are always found when the fall potato digging takes place.  The way the recipe was actually written calls for frozen peas anyway, so this is really a dish that you can serve any time you have small potatoes which are freshly dug.

This is how the recipe appeared in Ruth's cookbook when I copied it down way back in February of 2005:

Creamed Peas and New Potatoes
 
12 cooked whole pared new potatoes
2 c. frozen peas
 
Sauce:
4 TBLS. margarine
3 TBLS. flour
2 cups milk
salt and pepper to taste
 
First what you do is peel your potatoes.  Because of the way the recipe read, I wasn't sure whether the potatoes were peeled or not.  To me, "pared" simply means that any dark spots are cut out of them but the peeling remains.  However, the skin on new spring potatoes is always very thin and can often just be rubbed off with the fingers, so I asked Nancy, and she confirmed that the potatoes were always peeled.
 
Now, the recipe says to use 12 potatoes, but I wanted to use up a bunch of really tiny potatoes, and so I used more, and there was no problem in doing so. 
 
Boil the new potatoes and boil the peas in separate saucepans on the stove.  Just before they are done cooking, make the sauce.  To do that you . . .
 
a) Melt the margarine in a saucepan.
 
b) Stir in flour, salt, and pepper until smooth.
 
c) Add the milk gradually, stirring constantly.
 
d) Cook until thick and smooth.
 

In this picture, you can see the potatoes cooking in the Saladmaster
kettle on the back right by the teakettle.  The sauce is in the pan on
the front of the firebox, and the peas are on the cooler right side of
range because they had already come to a boil and were just remaining
warm.  We had boneless pork chops cooked in just a small splash of
olive oil for our meat.  The green canner with the hot pad on the top
and the other pot with the purple stuff in it are part of the preparations
that I was making in order to cook a batch of jelly after supper that
evening.
The last thing to do is drain the cooked potatoes and peas, pour them into the white sauce, and heat everything through.

When we sat down to eat, I carefully watched Nancy's face to see if I had succeeded because the whole dish seemed rather boring and unappealing to me. 

After a moment of silence, she said whimsically, "I'm a little girl back in Grandma's kitchen."

Success!

As I began to eat my portion of this, at first I wasn't very excited about it.  It really is extremely bland by today's standards for food; however, I'll admit that it grew on me quite a bit while we were eating it.  During the whole supper, I kept thinking of the phrase that my brother-in-law (he is part Hispanic) uses when anyone complains of food being too spicy.  He accuses them of being a "Mild-Mouthed Midwesterner."

Guilty as charged!  I always say that I don't like any food that bites me back.

However, I think that the next time I make this, I'm going to use garlic salt instead of plain salt because I think that would add just enough flavor to take this out of the boring category.  Don't tell Nancy, please.

Also, I'm going to try making it with butter instead of margarine.  I usually use butter in cooking except for very rare occasions and with specific reasons.  In fact, I thought about using butter in this recipe to begin with, but then I remembered that Ruth was never one to spend any money unnecessarily and knew instantly that she wouldn't have sprung for butter when margarine is so much cheaper.  And since I was trying to recreate Nancy's memory for her, I went ahead with the margarine this time and am glad I did.


Our finished supper.  

P.S. One last thing I should have mentioned above:

THANKS to all of my readers who have kept this blog so busy over the summer!  I'm continually amazed at how any hits I receive on a daily basis even when it is not wood cookstove season.  I'm excited to see how well this blog will do when I post more frequently!



Sunday, April 30, 2017

New Brownie Recipe for the Wood Cookstove

I'm really embarrassed at how much I enjoy brownies from box mixes.  However, we don't often buy them, and sometimes I am in a hurry.  In the February 15th edition of the Farm Bureau Spokesman, there was a recipe for brownies that caught my eye.  I've made (or helped make, depending on the situation) six batches of these brownies since the recipe came out, and of course, I've been tweaking the recipe too, and I think I'm finally happy with the result.  This recipe makes an extra large batch of brownies and is quick because you don't have to melt chocolate, butter, or shortening.  They're perfect for people in a hurry who don't have a brownie mix on hand.

Here is what you do:

1. Build your fire so that you will have a moderate oven.



2. Beat 1 cup brown sugar, 3/4 cup white sugar, 2/3 cup canola oil, and 4 eggs together.  I have used four duck eggs in each batch, and they have been superb.



3. Mix in 1/4 tsp. salt, 1/4 tsp. baking soda, 1/2 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1 tsp. burnt sugar flavoring, and 1/4 cup + 1 Tablespoon baking cocoa (I used extra rich baking cocoa purchased from an Amish bulk food store in the pictures that you see here.)


4. Add 2 cups sifted flour.


5. Pour the brownie batter into a greased 10" x 14" baking pan.  (I've learned that some people call these "lasagna pans.")


6. Sprinkle two handfuls of chocolate chips over the batter in the pan.



7. Bake for 25-30 minutes in a moderate oven or until they test done.  The brownies will puff up quite a bit, but don't worry.  As long as you take them out in time, they will fall within a few minutes of being removed from the oven and have the chewy texture that we all expect in a brownie. 



Usually, I like to frost brownies, but I've never frosted these, and I've never felt the lack.

Enjoy!

Thursday, December 29, 2016

One of the Reasons I Like Cooking on a Woodburning Cookstove

Last night, Nancy and I had baked potatoes for supper.  We like different things on baked potatoes, so we had a lot of different items to cook for toppings.  Marjorie looked like this:

We were (clockwise from top left) steaming broccoli, sautéing mushrooms in a dash of olive oil, heating water for an evening cup of hot chocolate, scenting the air with some stovetop potpourri, heating pork and beans, frying a ground beef patty to be broken up over my baked potato, and frying bacon for Nancy's potato.  Of course, the potatoes were baking in the oven.

If you didn't have a wood cookstove, you'd have to have an industrial range or some kind of humongous antique gas stove in order to cook this many things simultaneously, and even at that, you couldn't do it over a single fire while also heating water to do the supper dishes and have your evening shower.  Gotta love a woodburning cookstove!

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

"Prize Egg Yolk Cookies"

When I make from-scratch angel food cakes, I always put at least fourteen egg yolks in some kind of vessel in the refrigerator.  My great-grandmother always made Eleven Egg Yolk Cake, a recipe that I will share here sometime.  Nancy's grandmother always made homemade noodles.  I have done both, but over the summer I found a recipe that I think will become my tradition: Prize Egg Yolk Cookies.

My niece celebrated her 17th birthday on Thanksgiving Day, and she asked for an angel food with caramel frosting (the traditional birthday cake on my mom's side of the family), so I had some egg yolks in the fridge a few weeks ago, and these were soon on the menu.

I found this recipe in the March 1956 edition of the Kitchen Klatter Magazine.  It says there that it was "repeated by request," and I also have this same recipe in a publication put out by Shenandoah, Iowa, radio personality Billie Oakley in the mid-1980s.  Another person put this recipe on food.com from the Billie Oakley publication at this link; however, the flavoring is slightly changed.  No matter where you want to believe that it originated, this is a great way to get rid of extra egg yolks and a delicious cookie recipe.

Here is what you do:

1. Cream one cup of butter and a cup and a half of sugar.




2. Add six egg yolks (or three whole eggs).


3. Beat in one teaspoon soda and one teaspoon cream of tartar.  I love the flavor of cream of tartar in cookies.


4. Add one teaspoon of vanilla and a half teaspoon of lemon flavoring. 


5. Stir in two and a half cups of sifted flour.


6. Roll the dough into small balls, coat with sugar, place on an ungreased cookie sheet, and flatten with the bottom of a drinking glass.

Cookies that have already been flattened with the glass are on the right.
7. Bake in a moderate oven until desired doneness has been achieved, about 8-10 minutes.  If you like a chewy cookie, don't let these begin to brown around the edges.  They will be crunchy if you let them begin to brown.


8. Remove from cookie sheet immediately to cool.  Cooling cookies on paper towels like this helps them remain chewy.  If you want cookies that are more crunchy, use a cooling rack.


Store indefinitely in an airtight container.  From what I've read, these also freeze well, but I've never tried that.

Here is the recipe in a more compact format:

Prize Egg Yolk Cookies

1 cup butter
1 1/2 cups sugar
6 egg yolks
1 tsp. soda
1 tsp. cream of tartar
1 tsp. vanilla
1/2 tsp. lemon flavoring
2 1/2 c. sifted flour

Cream butter and sugar.  Beat in next five ingredients.  Stir in flour.  Shape into small balls, roll in sugar, place on cookie sheet and flatten with a glass.  Bake at 350 for 8-10 minutes.

These have that classic sugar cookie flavor that many people love.  Enjoy!