Thursday, April 12, 2018

A Single Sentence about Cookstoves

Today I am substituting as the media specialist at the school where I used to teach full-time.  I truly enjoy substituting for the media specialist, but my love of books is a complete handicap to any speed I might develop when it comes to managing circulation.  One of the students asked me how my day was going this afternoon, and I had to honestly admit that I'm kind of exhausted because I'm trying to read as many books as possible.  Today I may have actually mastered the art of speed reading/skimming a novel--a talent I have developed about 25 years too late for it to be as useful as it would have been when I was in college.

Then while I was dusting shelves in the high school library, I ran across the 1970 history book which was written to honor Shelby, Iowa's centennial.  I student-taught in Shelby over twenty years ago, and I have always enjoyed the town, so I pulled the book off the shelf and thumbed through it.

Smack in the middle of the book, I ran across a picture of a lady standing at a woodburning cookstove.  I think it is a stock picture that I've seen before, but the text that goes with it is fun.  It is entitled "LONGEST SENTENCE IN THE BOOK."  And I quote:

     "The old cook stove was the most versatile of all household possessions, for it cooked our food; baked our bread; heated water for washing, butchering, dishes, family baths and general cleaning; heated our flat irons; rendered our lard; made our soap; canned our meat, fruit and vegetables; made jams and jellies in season; heated the kitchen; dried the clothes; warmed up new born pigs; dried off baby chickens caught in the rain; warmed a chilled foot or two; popped our corn; made our candy; kept the teakettle boiling to humidify the house; burned our trash and utilized cobs and wood raised on the farm."

. . . and they still can today.


Friday, April 6, 2018

Will Somebody Please Explain This One?

All right.  First, let me just remind you that I spend WAY TOO MUCH TIME trolling about on Craigslist and eBay keeping track of the wood and coal cookstoves that are for sale.  Truly, I'm kind of embarrassed by this habit, but I learn a lot this way, too.  Not only do I get to see some really interesting vintage ranges, but I also am fascinated by the occasional glimpse at the way other people have incorporated a woodburning cookstove into their kitchen design.

However, I ran across something this week that has me scratching my head.  You all saw the picture of the Hayes-Custer stove that I acquired a few weeks ago:






Now check out this stove near Iron River, Wisconsin, near Eau Claire, that I found at this link:

https://eauclaire.craigslist.org/atq/d/antique-wood-stove/6536706027.html





The text with the ad says that this is a Marshall-Wells stove, but you can clearly see that the design is exactly the same as the Hayes-Custer.  This one is equipped with the warming oven, and instead of a large blank plate to the right of the firebox, this cooktop has four additional lids, but these were usually features that buyers could opt for if they wished to spend a little more money.

So what happened here?

At the Rochelle Gridley website entitled "100 Years Ago in the Pantagraph," where I found some of my information for my last post, the following sentence appears:

"After the 1929 fire the Association of Commerce gave some aid to help the company get on its feet again, but in 1936 the Hayes Custer Company accepted a contract with a mail order company that turned out to be a very bad deal for Hayes Custer and the contract was abrogated by a court, ending the company's operations outside the bankruptcy court."

Was Marshall-Wells that mail order company?

Another guess is that once Hayes-Custer went out of business, they sold their design specs to Marshall-Wells in Duluth.  But that is just a guess.  (The plans for the "Qualified Range" went through several foundries like that, the last one that I know of being the Hitzer Company in Indiana.)  Marshall-Wells sold woodburning cookstoves for a number of years after this one, manufacturing some really nice-looking white cabinet style models later on.  However, it could also be that Hayes-Custer built cookstoves for Marshall-Wells who simply put its name on the product.  Once Hayes-Custer went out of business, Marshall-Wells could have switched foundries.

Can anyone clear this up for me?  I'm really curious now.